Grant Murray

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Emergent

Published February 16th, 2013

I've always found the Tessellated Pavement at Eaglehawk Neck on the Tasman Peninsula (Tasmania) both facinating and beautiful. Rarely are rock formations so symmetrical.When you add a mirrored post-processing effect to this natural symmetry, the results are quite startling. This image reminds me of the scales of some prehistoric beast emerging from the primordial depths.

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When Worlds Collide

Published February 14th, 2013

I've been to the remote Western Arthurs Range in south west Tasmania three times over the past 18 months. The first of these trips was in mid-winter. According to the log book at the beginning of the walk, no-one else had been on the range for the previous month. There is a five hour walk (four in summer, due to less mud) to the base of the range and then another couple of hours up a steep moraine to the top. Many walkers then spend the next week walking the twenty or so kilometres to the other end of the rugged range. I prefer to spend most of my time on the western end of the range, making a base camp and then exploring the intricate details of the terrain. There are so many dramatic peaks, alpine meadows and glacial lakes that I never get tired of returning. I feel quite at home there.

This photograph was taken close to Mt Hayes. It encapsulates the mythical qualities of the landscape that are so apparent as I spend time alone in these remote regions.

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Mt Field National Park, Tasmania.

What Dreams May Come

Published February 13th, 2013

This is another image form my 'Another World' series. This is Horseshoe Falls, not far from the ever popular Russell Falls, in Mt Field National Park, Tasmania, an hour and a half's drive from Hobart. It is photographed hundreds of times a day during the peak tourist season. My original un-mirrored shot was pleasing enough, due to the dominant moss covered boulder and the circular swirl of water in the forground, yet the mirrored version adds a sense of the ethereal.

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This image was taken at a remarkably scenic piece of coastline on the Tasman Peninsula, called Cape Hauy, here in Tasmania. There is a relatively short walk (just over an hour, from memory) over a recently upgraded track (part of the new Three Capes walk). Even without the mirroring the sea stack is pretty impressive, rising 122m out of the Great South Ocean. Most people look down on it from the top of the adjoining headland, but the intrepid can get a view from close to sea level by descending down a rock climbers track towards the aptly named Totem Pole (a 60m high sea stack that has a diametre of only 4m - impressive).

'Another World'

Published February 13th, 2013

'Another World' is a series of images that I've been working on for the past two years. Many of the photographs were taken in remote, rugged locations, eight or ten kilometres walk from the nearest road. By using a post-processing mirroring technique I have departed from a conventional representation of these landscapes and envisaged a world that is compelling and mystical. As humans we are naturally attracted to symmetry. Yet, seeing perfect symmetry in natural world is as unexpected as it is intriguing.

This image was taken at a remarkably scenic piece of coastline on the Tasman Peninsula, called Cape Hauy, here in Tasmania. There is a relatively short walk (just over an hour, from memory) over a recently upgraded track (part of the new Three Capes walk). Even without the mirroring the sea stack is pretty impressive, rising 122m out of the Great South Ocean. Most people look down on it from the top of the adjoining headland, but the intrepid can get a view from close to sea level by ...

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