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You know how it is, we read websites, magazines, and newspapers telling you about your health, obesity, exercise, nutrition, stress and all other kinds of related topics. There is a lot of false news out here, and you don’t know what’s true or false. On Monday, obesity is caused by one thing and by Wednesday, it’s something else. Eat this, not that, and a day or two later, it’s just the reverse.

So here are some tips to help you identify what is Fake Health News

1. Can you verify what’s being said from multiple sources? Fake health news is often passed from one fake website to another, so it’s a little more complicated. Check the bottom of the article to see if this was an author from the website posting the information or whether it was taken from somewhere else then keep drilling down until you find the source. Another way is to check it on Snopes or some other fact-checking website.

2. Is the source of the information credible? Every legitimate article related to health should have references. The references may be scientific journals or press releases from journals; yes, there are fake journals, but they’re rare. The point whether you can find the original sources. Sites such as WebMD and PubMed are almost always reliable, but check whether it’s a research report or just someone’s opinion. Government sites that are a great are the National Institutes of Health publish, and the American Heart Association

3. When was the news story published? That seems simple enough, but many fake health articles don’t have a date.

4. What is the author's expertise and background with the subject? Check someone’s education, training, and resume online in places such as Linked-In. Be suspicious if you find nothing there or elsewhere.

5. Does it match your prior knowledge? Sometimes you have to use common sense. We all come to the table with a certain amount of knowledge. When it comes to health, it may be from a high school health class, listening to your doctor, or other ways you’ve learned reliable health facts. Does what you’re reading seem to agree or conflict with that? True Science changes as we get newer technology, but it should still line up with what you’ve learned.

6. Finally, does it make any sense? What does your gut tell you? Sometimes you have to use common sense. We all come to the table with a certain amount of knowledge. When it comes to health, it may be from a high school health class, listening to your doctor, or other ways you’ve learned reliable health facts. Does what you’re reading seem to agree or conflict with that? True Science changes as we get newer technology, but come on now, it should still line up with what you’ve learned.

Some fake news are just put out there for is often click

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