Copenhagen, Denmark

Published June 12th, 2014

Copenhagen is the capital and most populated city of Denmark, with an urban population of 1,246,611 and a metropolitan population of 1,969,941.

Originally a Viking fishing village founded in the 10th century, Copenhagen became the capital of Denmark in the early 15th century. During the 17th century, under the reign of Christian IV, it developed into an important regional centre, consolidating its position as capital of Denmark and Norway with its institutions, defences and armed forces. After suffering from the effects of plague and fire in the 18th century, the city underwent a period of redevelopment which included the prestigious district of Frederiksstaden and cultural institutions such as the Royal Theatre and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. After further disasters in the early 19th century when Nelson attacked the Danish fleet and bombarded the city, rebuilding during the Danish Golden Age brought a Neoclassical look to Copenhagen's architecture. Later, following the Second Wor ...

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Brazilian Spring

Published June 23rd, 2013

Images on the protests in São Paulo from June 17th to 20th

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Porto, Portugal

Published March 3rd, 2013

Porto, also known as Oporto in English, is the second-largest city in Portugal, after Lisbon, and one of the major urban areas in Southern Europe. Its administrative limits (an area of 41.66 km²/16 sq.mi) include a population of 237,584 (2011) inhabitants distributed within 15 civil parishes. The urban area of Porto, which extends beyond the administrative limits of the city, has a population of 1.3 million (2011) in an area of 389 km2 (150 sq mi), making it the second-largest urban area in Portugal. The Porto Metropolitan Area includes approximately 1.7 million people, It is recognized as a Gamma- level global city by the Globalization and World Cities (GaWC) Study Group, being one of five cities on the Iberian Peninsula with global city status, (the others being Madrid, Barcelona, Lisbon and Valencia).

Located along the Douro river estuary in northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and registered as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996. Its settlement date ...

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Santuário do Sameiro, Braga, Portugal

Published February 13th, 2013

The Sanctuary of Our Lady of Sameiro (or Sanctuary of Sameiro) is a sanctuary and Marian shrine located in Braga, in the surroundings of the city of Braga, Portugal.

Construction was begun on 14 July 1863 on the domed church of Nossa Senhora do Sameiro (Our Lady of Sameiro). The founder of the shrine was the Vicar of Braga, Padre Antonio Martinho Pereira da Silva. The sanctuary is the largest Marian devotional shrine in Portugal, second only to the Sanctuary of Fátima.

Pope John Paul II visited this Marian shrine on May 15, 1982.

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Ponte de Lima

Published February 13th, 2013

One of the oldest towns in Portugal (founded on the 4th March 1125), it was historically significant as a Roman settlement in the road from Braga to Santiago de Compostela and Lugo, and the first place in Portugal getting a municipal chart.

Every second Monday, it holds one of the largest country markets in Portugal.

The attractive rural area around has the largest concentration of baroque manors in Portugal (Bertiandos, Brandara, Calheiros, and Pomarchão are among the best known); Some provide tourism accommodation.

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Valença do Minho

Published February 11th, 2013

@ Valença do Minho, Portugal

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Caminha

Published February 9th, 2013

Caminha is located 2 km from the Atlantic Ocean, on the southern side of the Minho estuary, where this river is met by the smaller and meandering Coura. Here the Minho reaches its widest point (about 2 km) and marks the border between Portugal and Spain. The highly scenic area, with the wide estuary marked by low-tide sandbars, a pastoral and green rural landscape, and pine forests on the slopes of the granitic mountains is increasingly popular for second homes and as a summer resort.

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Cabo da Roca / Cascais

Published February 7th, 2013

Cabo da Roca and Cascais, Portugal

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Sintra, Portugal

Published February 5th, 2013

Sintra is a town within the municipality of Sintra in the Grande Lisboa subregion (Lisbon Region) of Portugal. Owing to its 19th-century Romantic architecture and landscapes, it has become a major tourist centre, visited by many day-trippers who travel from the urbanized suburbs and capital of Lisbon.

In addition to the Sintra Mountains and Sintra-Cascais Nature Park, the parishes of the town of Sintra are dotted by royal retreats, estates, castles and buildings from the 8th-9th century, in addition to many buildings completed between the 15th and 19th century, including the Castelo dos Mouros, the Pena National Palace and the Sintra National Palace, resulting in its classification by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1995.

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Marrakesh

Published January 30th, 2013

Marrakesh is a major city in the northwest African nation of Morocco. With a population of 794,620 and 1,063,415 in the metropolitan area according to the 2004 census, it is Morocco's second largest city after Casablanca, and the capital of the mid-southwestern economic region of Marrakech-Tensift-El Haouz, near the foothills of the snow-capped Atlas Mountains.

Marrakesh is the most important of the four former imperial cities in the history of Morocco. Inhabited by Berber farmers from Neolithic times, the city was founded in 1062 by Abu Bakr ibn Umar, chieftain and cousin of Yusuf ibn Tashfin. Led by the Almoravids, many mosques including the Koutoubia Mosque and madrasas (Koranic schools) were built here during the 12th century with Andalusian influence. The red walls of the city, built by Ali ibn Yusuf in 1122-1123, and various buildings constructed during this period have given the city the nickname of the "Red City" or "Ochre City" because of the red sandstone used. Marrakesh gr ...

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Essaouira

Published January 24th, 2013

Essaouira is a city in the western Moroccan economic region of Marrakech-Tensift-Al Haouz, on the Atlantic coast.

Since the 16th century, the city has also been known by its Portuguese name of Mogador or Mogadore. The Berber name means the wall, a reference to the fortress walls that originally enclosed the city.

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Telouet

Published January 16th, 2013

Telouet is a Kasbah along the former route of the caravans from the Sahara over the Atlas Mountains to Marrakech. It lies at an elevation of 1,800 metres (5,900 ft) and was the seat of the El Glaoui family's power. The palace can still be visited but it is steadily becoming more damaged and is slowly collapsing.

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Ounila Valley

Published January 13th, 2013

The fertile valley of the Ounila River near Ait Benhaddou, Morocco. The snow covered Atlas mountains in the background.

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Ait Benhaddou

Published January 10th, 2013

Aït Benhaddou is a 'fortified city', or ksar, along the former caravan route between the Sahara and Marrakech in present-day Morocco. It is situated in Souss-Massa-Drâa on a hill along the Ounila River and is known for its kasbahs, although they take damage with each rainstorm. Most of the town's inhabitants now live in a more modern village at the other side of the river; however, ten families still live within the ksar.

Aït Benhaddou has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987 and several films have been shot there, including;

Sodom And Gomorrah (1963)

The Man Who Would Be King (film) (1975)

The Message (film) (1976)

Jesus of Nazareth (1977)

Time Bandits (1981)

Marco Polo (1982)

The Jewel of the Nile (1985)

The Living Daylights (1987)

The Last Temptation of Christ (1988)

The Sheltering Sky (1990)

Kundun (1997)

The Mummy (1999)

Gladiator (2000)

Alexander (2004)

Kingdom of Heaven (2005)

Prince of Persia (2010)

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Zagora

Published January 5th, 2013

Zagora is a town in the valley of the Draa River in Souss-Massa-Drâa, southeastern Morocco. It is flanked by the mountain Zagora from which the town got its name. Originally it was called 'Tazagourt' the singular of plural 'Tizigirt', Berber for 'twinpeaks', referring to the form of the mountain.

In old European maps the mountain Zagora is already indicated but the town itself was only built in the 20th century. On the top of the Zagora mountain the remains of an Almoravid fortress can still be seen.

The exact location of the former Almoravid mosque is still a matter of dispute. Each year the moussem (festival) of the Sufi saint moulay Abdelkader Jilali is celebrated at Zagora. Languages spoken in the city include Moroccan Arabic, Tachelhit and Tamazight. A well known sign at the town border states "Tombouctou 52 days", the supposed time it takes to get to Timbuktu, Mali on foot or camel.

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N'kob

Published January 3rd, 2013

Nkob is the capital village of the Berber Ait Atta tribe. The Ait Atta belongs to Confederation Ait Atta that are spread along Ouarzazate, Errachidia, and Azil Provinces.

The Amazigh Ait Atta are an ancient Berber tribe existent before Arab and Islam entrance in Morocco in the 7th century. The Ait Atta tribe were the most important Moroccan tribes between the 15th and the 19th century.

If you're looking to go deep into the Berber life of south Morocco, Nkob can be quite interesting and offers great experiences.

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Todgha Gorge / Tinerhir

Published January 1st, 2013

Todgha Gorge is a canyon in the eastern part of the High Atlas Mountains in Morocco, near the town of Tinerhir. Both the Todgha and neighbouring Dades Rivers have carved out cliff-sided canyons on their final 40 kilometres (25 mi) through the mountains.

The last 600 metres (1,969 ft) of the Todgha gorge are the most spectacular. Here the canyon narrows to a flat stony track, in places as little as 10 metres (33 ft) wide, with sheer and smooth rock walls up to 160 metres (525 ft) high on each side.

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Rissani

Published December 30th, 2012

Rissani is the ancient capital of Tafilalet. Its location as a crossroads between north and south gave the city a certain importance in previous times.

A former major caravan center, Rissani remains a major commercial center in the region, with a large souk, particularly lively on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. It is noted for its leather and goat skin trading.

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Erg Chebbi, Sahara Desert, Morocco

Published December 29th, 2012

Erg Chebbi is one of Morocco's two Saharan ergs – large dunes formed by wind-blown sand. The other is Erg Chigaga near M'hamid.

The dunes of Erg Chebbi reach a height of up to 150 meters and altogether spans an area of 22 kilometers from north to south and up to 5-10 kilometers from east to west.

The nearest sizable town is Erfoud, about 60 kilometers further north. One other city is Rissani, around 40 kilometers from Merzouga, and from 8 to 14 century was a separate kingdom, known as Sijilmassa, prosperous of the caravan routes. Merzouga, the local tourist center, is located near the edge of the dunes.

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Fes, Morocco

Published December 23rd, 2012

Fes or Fez is the second largest city of Morocco, with a population of approximately 1 million (2010). It is the capital of the Fès-Boulemane region.

Fas el Bali is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its medina, the larger of the two medinas of Fes, is believed to be the world's largest contiguous car-free urban area. Al-Qarawiyyin, founded in AD 859, is the oldest continuously functioning madrasa in the world. The city has been called the "Mecca of the West" and the "Athens of Africa".

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Chefchaouen, Morocco

Published December 17th, 2012

Chefchaouen or Chaouen is a city in northwest Morocco. It is the chief town of the province of the same name, and is noted for its buildings in shades of blue.

Chefchaouen is situated in the Rif Mountains, just inland from Tangier and Tetouan. The city was founded in 1471, as a small fortress which still exists to this day, by Moorish exiles from Spain led by Moulay Ali Ben Moussa Ben Rached El Alami to fight the Portuguese invasions of northern Morocco. It was known as one of the main concentrations of Moriscos and Jews who sought refuge in this mountainous city after the Spanish Reconquista in medieval times. In 1920, the Spanish seized Chefchaouen to form part of Spanish Morocco. Spanish troops imprisoned Abd el-Krim in the kasbah from 1916 to 1917, after he talked with the German consul Dr. Walter Zechlin (1879–1962). (After defeating him with the help of the French force Abd el-Krim was deported to Réunion in 1926). Spain returned the city after the independence of Morocco in 195 ...

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Venezuela

Published December 14th, 2012

Venezuela!

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Moulay Idriss

Published December 11th, 2012

Moulay Idriss and Volubilis, in Morocco

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Meknes, Morocco

Published December 3rd, 2012

Meknes is a city in northern Morocco, 130 kilometres (81 mi) from the capital Rabat and 60 kilometres (37 mi) from Fes.

A Berber tribe called the Miknasa, originated from the Tunisian south, settled here in the 9th century.

The Almoravids founded here a fortress in the 9th century. It resisted to the Almohads rise, and was thus destroyed by them, only to be rebuilt in larger size with mosques and large fortifications. Under the Merinids it received further madrasas, kasbahs and mosques in the early 14th century, and continued to thrive under the Wattasid dynasty. Meknes saw its golden age as the imperial capital of Moulay Ismail following his accession to the Sultanate of Morocco (1672–1727). He installed under the old city a large prison to house Christian sailors captured on the sea, and also constructed numerous edifices, gardens, monumental gates, mosques (whence the city's nickname of "City of the Hundred Minarets") and the large line of wall, having a length of 40 km.

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Rabat, Morocco

Published November 27th, 2012

a short view of Moroccan capital, Rabat.

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Casablanca

Published November 25th, 2012

Casablanca is a city in western Morocco, located on the Atlantic Ocean. It is the capital of the Grand Casablanca region.

Casablanca is Morocco's largest city as well as its chief port. It is also the biggest city in the Maghreb region. The 2004 census recorded a population of 2,949,805 in the prefecture of Casablanca and 3,631,061 in the region of Grand Casablanca. Casablanca is considered the economic and business center of Morocco, while the political capital city of Morocco is Rabat.

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Argentina

Published November 23rd, 2012

Argentina 2009 - 2011

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Região Centro de Portugal

Published November 17th, 2012

The Centro Region is a region in central Portugal, and its capital is Coimbra. Other local cities with major administrative status inside this region are Aveiro, Viseu, Leiria, Castelo Branco and Guarda. It is one of seven Regions of Portugal (NUTS II subdivisions). This is one of the regions of Europe, considered by the European Union for statistical and geographical purposes. Its population in 2011 totalled 2,327,026 inhabitants, and its area is 28,462 km² (density of 82 inhabitants per square kilometre).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centro,_Portugal

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El Mapa de Todos 2012

Published November 15th, 2012

Festival El Mapa de Todos 2012

Latin American Music Festival in Porto Alegre, Brazil

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Lisboa

Published November 2nd, 2012

Lisboa, Portugal;

Setembro, 2012

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