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Street Photographer's Toolbox: Aestheticism

Published May 25th, 2012

CONNOTATIONS:
AESTHETICISM



This is actually one of the very few places where Roland Barthes refers to the great master of French street photography: Henri Cartier - Bresson. The article is written in 1961 and Bresson was at his peak of performance as a photographer.



In describing his fifth connotation procedure Aestheticism, Barthes uses these words: "Thus Henri Cartier - Bresson constructed Cardinal Pacelli's reception by the faithful of Lisieux like a painting by an earlier master. The resulting photograph, however, is in no way a painting ...". /24



In the sentences before this rare reference to Cartier - Bresson, Barthes says: "For if one can talk of aestheticism in photography, it is seemingly in an ambiguous fashion"./24 When photography try to turn painting it could be a) either a trial or an aspiration suggesting that photography, like painting, indeed is an art form in its own right; or b) "to impose a generally more subtle and complex signified than would be possible with other connotation procedures"./24



This is then the ambiguity that Barthes is talking about: the aspiration to be art, or to invoke more subtle connotations. Fair enough.



The reference to Cartier - Bresson is very convenient. Cartier - Bresson's dream in early days was, in fact, to become a painter, and he chose photography only as a second option having tried his way as a painter with no great success. Cartier - Bresson was indeed familiar with the rules of composition and he stuck to the classic guidelines all of his life. It is said, that he even had a little notebook with him in which he kept sketches of famous paintings as an ongoing inspiration for his photography. A brilliant idea if that is the road you want to take as a photographer.



The big question is: what could be the connotative effects of for instance Cartier - Bressons road to photography leaning as he did on classical guidelines for composition. Here comes the answer, or at least one of them: the connotations embedded in such a procedure is that of harmony, beauty and pleasantness. All of them Cartier - Bressons trademarks as a photographer.



It would be absolutely wrong to say that Cartier - Bresson was a copier of master painters, but is would be absolutely right to state that he indeed used classical rules for compositions in his photographic work.



To use a similar path to photography, or for that matter NOT to use a similar path to photography, both require knowledge of the matter. Knowledge of painters' ways, knowledge of compositional structures. How else could one hope to connote anything bases on aestheticism.



This discussion brings us back to more practical matters. One of the ideas of Street Photographer's Toolbox is, indeed, to disclose basic rules of composition. Not to become painters, but to stay photographers.



Have a good day.



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25/05/2012



Relates posts in this section: Introduction; Trick Effects; Pose; Objects; Photogenia; Aestheticism; and Syntax.



Library Thing: Image, Music, Text, Fontana Press, London 1977.



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IMPORTANT:



As you probably know by now these post are written for the blog: Street Photographer's Toolbox. The blog is under development but not made public yet. Stay tuned. Have a very good day :-). Thanks for reading.

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Docklands

Hamburg, August 2011.

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