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What do you get when you spend a little over 6 hours (with permission from the building's owner) in an abandoned theatre, a camera, good friends, and a passion for photography? You get lots of photos!

I set out to get at least one panorama or a vertorama shot in of the theatre's stage and seating. In the past I have always got just the stage and proscenium or just the seating. Well, I quickly abandoned that goal as there was so much to do.

But when I went though the shots I had, I noticed that I did have 2 shots that might be able to be blended together to get a vertorama (an up and down panorama as opposed to side to side standard panorama).

The 2 shots barely lined up and there is considerable, delicious (to me anyway) lens distortion using the 8-16mm ultra-wide lens. It took a whole lot of tweaking. Had to run it through 2 different pano software.

So, what you are seeing is a very large file. It is a "pseudo-HDR".

www.orphinc.org

"The Orpheum opened on April 15th, 1912 at a very important time in American history. Little did the people know at the ”Grand Opening” that the Titanic would sink on that very same night. This was just before World War I, when the City’s mills were busy, the economy was good even though the whaling industry was slowly declining.

The Orpheum was constructed under the ownership of The French Sharpshooter’s Club of New Bedford. This esteemed group operated a ballroom and armored shooting range in the building for nearly fifty years. Le Club des Francs-Tireurs had many events such as dances, benefits, and shooting tournaments. The Club was instrumental in raising and training recruits for both World Wars. The theatre was leased from the Sharpshooter’s to the Orpheum Circuit of Boston."

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